ILO Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization

The UN and the world will observe tomorrow 20 Feb, the World Day of Social Justice.
Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants. We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.
For the United Nations, the pursuit of social justice for all is at the core of our global mission to promote development and human dignity. The adoption by the International Labour Organization of the Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization is just one recent example of the UN system’s commitment to social justice. The Declaration focuses on guaranteeing fair outcomes for all through employment, social protection, social dialogue, and fundamental principles and rights at work.
This opportunity is excellent to revisit in this age, the ILO (2008) Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization.
The Declaration came at a crucial political moment,
reflecting the wide consensus on the need for a strong social dimension to globalization in achieving improved and fair outcomes for all. It constitutes a compass for the promotion of a fair globalization based on Decent Work, as well as a practical tool to accelerate progress in the implementation of the Decent Work Agenda at the country level. It also reflects a productive outlook by highlighting the importance of sustainable enterprises in creating greater employment and income opportunities for all.
The Declaration provides leaders and decision-makers with a balanced approach that connects with people and productive solutions at home, while also offering a common platform for governance at the international level. It contributes to policy coherence for sustainable development in national policies, among international organizations and in development cooperation, bringing together social, economic and environmental objectives. In this regard, it highlights that international and regional organizations with mandates in closely related fields can play an important role in the implementation of the integrated approach required and invites them to promote decent work. It states that as trade and financial market policy both affect employment, it is the ILO’s role to evaluate those employment effects to achieve its aim of placing employment at the heart of economic policies.
The Declaration also calls for developing new partnerships with non-state entities and economic actors, such as multinational enterprises and trade unions operating at the global sectoral level, in order to enhance the effectiveness of ILO operational programmes and activities.
Considering that the present context of globalization, characterized by the diffusion of new technologies, the f ow of ideas, the exchange of goods and services, the increase in capital and financial flows, the internationalization of
business and business processes and dialogue as well as the movement of persons, especially working women
and men, is reshaping the world of work in profound ways:
– on the one hand, the process of economic cooperation and integration has helped a number of countries to benef t from high rates of economic growth and employment creation, to absorb many of the rural poor into the modern urban economy, to advance their developmental goals, and to foster innovation in product development and the circulation of ideas;
– on the other hand, global economic integration has caused many countries and sectors to face major challenges of income inequality, continuing high levels of unemployment and poverty, vulnerability of economies to external shocks, and the growth of both unprotected work and the informal economy, which impact on the employment relationship and the protections it can offer;
Recognizing that achieving an improved and fair outcome for all has become even more necessary in these circumstances to meet the universal aspiration for social justice, to reach full employment, to ensure the  sustainability of open societies and the global economy, to achieve social cohesion and to combat poverty and rising inequalities.
Strategic Objectives
1.promoting employment by creating a sustainable institutional and economic environment in which:
– individuals can develop and update the necessary capacities and skills they need to enable them to be productively occupied for their personal fulf lment and the common well-being;– all enterprises, public or private, are sustainable to enable growth and the generation of greater employment and income opportunities and prospects for all; and – societies can achieve their goals of economic development, good living standards and social progress;
2.developing and enhancing measures of social protection – social security and labour protection – which are sustainable and adapted to national circumstances, including: – the extension of social security to all, including
measures to provide basic income to all in need of such protection, and adapting its scope and coverage to meet the new needs and uncertainties generated by the rapidity of technological, societal, demographic and economic changes; – healthy and safe working conditions; and – policies in regard to wages and earnings, hours and other conditions of work, designed to ensure a just share of the fruits of progress to all and a minimum living wage to all employed and in need of such protection;
3. promoting social dialogue and tripartism as the most appropriate methods for: – adapting the implementation of the strategic objectives to the needs and circumstances of each country; – translating economic development into social progress, and social progress into economic development; – facilitating consensus building on relevant national and international policies that impact on employment and decent work strategies and programmes;
and – making labour law and institutions effective,
including in respect of the recognition of the employment relationship, the promotion of good industrial relations and the building of effective labour inspection systems; and (iv) respecting, promoting and realizing the fundamental
principles and rights at work, which are of particular significance, as both rights and enabling conditions that are necessary for the full realization of all of the strategic objectives, noting: – that freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining are particularly important to enable the attainment of the four strategic objectives; and that the violation of fundamental principles and rights at work cannot be invoked or otherwise used as a legitimate comparative advantage and that labour standards should not be used for protectionist trade purposes.
The four strategic objectives are inseparable, interrelated and mutually supportive. The failure to promote any one of them would harm progress towards the others.
Decent Work Agenda
1.promoting employment by creating a sustainable institutional and economic environment in which:
– individuals can develop and update the necessary capacities and skills they need to enable them to be productively occupied for their personal fulfillment and the common well-being;– all enterprises, public or private, are sustainable to enable growth and the generation of greater employment and income opportunities and prospects for all; and – societies can achieve their goals of economic development, good living standards and social progress;
2.developing and enhancing measures of social protection – social security and labour protection – which are sustainable and adapted to national circumstances,
including: – the extension of social security to all, including measures to provide basic income to all in need of such protection, and adapting its scope and coverage to meet the new needs and uncertainties generated by the rapidity of technological, societal, demographic and economic changes; – healthy and safe working conditions; and
– policies in regard to wages and earnings, hours and other conditions of work, designed to ensure a just share of the fruits of progress to all and a minimum living wage to all employed and in need of such protection;
3.promoting social dialogue and tripartism as the most appropriate methods for: – adapting the implementation of the strategic objectives to the needs and circumstances of each country; – translating economic development into social progress, and social progress into economic development; – facilitating consensus building on relevant national and international policies that impact on employment and decent work strategies and programmes;
and – making labour law and institutions effective, including in respect of the recognition of the employment relationship, the promotion of good industrial relations and the building of effective labour inspection systems; and
4.respecting, promoting and realizing the fundamental principles and rights at work, which are of particular significance, as both rights and enabling conditions that are necessary for the full realization of all of the strategic objectives, noting:– that freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining are particularly important to enable the attainment of the four strategic objectives; and – that the violation of  fundamental principles and rights at work cannot be invoked or otherwise used as a legitimate comparative advantage and that labour standards should not be used for protectionist trade purposes.

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