The 3rd Trainig Course in the Newborn Early Detection Program (2-2)

Haffiya Elyas, Photo: Al-Sir Mukhtar

Permanent hearing loss is one of the most common conditions in newborns. Without screening, it can be hard to tell if a baby has hearing loss. Even though a baby may respond to sounds, they may not hear well enough to develop speech and language fully.
Over half of all babies identified with permanent hearing loss are healthy and have no family history. The earlier hearing loss is found, the sooner a baby will have support to help them develop language to prevent delays in their development.Hearing screening is quick, safe, and will not hurt your baby. Have your baby’s hearing screened as early as possible.
The Sudanese National Society for the Deaf in collaboration with Save the Children will organize today the 3rd Training Course in the Newborn Early Hearing Detection from 16-20 July at the Regency Hotel.
The aim of the project is to detect early intervention , targering Medical cadres from three suba hospital, doctors , and Oumdurman hospital.The Sudanese National Society for the Deaf revealed that challengies facing people with disability specially people with hearing loss.
Director of Sudanese National Society for the Deaf Sakina Mohammed Mabrouk pointed out that the workshop comes to promote and advocate children issues specially children with disabilities .
Secretary General of the Council of Disability, Khartoum State Rashid Al Tigani pointed out to the importance of early detection of the deaf
,saying that the Council seeks to make early detection of the deaf mandatory in all maternity hospitals
*Strengthen Maternal and Child Healthcare Programmes:*
Millions of people across the world live with disabling hearing loss. The vast majority live in low- and middle-income countries where they often do not have access to appropriate ear and hearing care services.
Without suitable interventions, hearing loss poses a significant challenge in the lives of those affected. Many causes of hearing loss can be prevented through public health measures. Through rehabilitation, education and empowerment, people with hearing loss can reach their full potential.
Raising awareness and improving access to services at the primary level can help to reduce the prevalence and adverse impact of hearing loss.
There are significant costs associated with the impacts of unaddressed hearing loss. These include costs to the health, education and employment sectors as well as the costs associated with lost productivity. Interventions to address hearing loss including prevention, screening and provision of hearing devices are cost effective.
It is estimated that up to five out of every 1000 babies are born with hearing loss or acquire it soon after birth. Hearing loss can have a significant impact on a child’s development and educational achievements. Early identification of such hearing loss followed by prompt and suitable interventions can help to ensure that children with deafness and hearing loss enjoy equal opportunities in society.
Over 30% of hearing loss in children is caused by diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis and ear infections. It is estimated that up to 330 million people suffer with chronic ear infections or chronic otitis media globally. When left untreated, chronic ear infections lead to hearing loss and can cause life-threatening complications and mortality. Chronic ear infections are preventable and can be managed effectively through medical and surgical interventions.
Left untreated, hearing loss can lead to people being excluded from the most basic communication, thereby contributing to feelings of loneliness, frustration and social isolation. Hearing loss in the elderly is linked with early cognitive decline and dementia. Age-related hearing loss can be managed effectively through a variety of means, including hearing aids.
Current production of hearing aids meets less than 10% of the global need, and in developing countries, this figure is less than 3%. It is estimated that there are 72 million people who could potentially benefit from the use of a hearing device.
Deaf people often use sign language as a means of communication. Family members, medical professionals, teachers and employers should be encouraged to learn signs/sign language in order to facilitate communication with deaf people. The use of loop systems in classrooms and public places, as well as the provision of captions on audio-visual media, are important for improving the accessibility of communication for people with hearing loss.
Strategies for the prevention of hearing loss include:Strengthen maternal and child healthcare programmes including immunizationImplement infant and school-based hearing screeningTrain healthcare professionals in hearing careMake hearing devices and communication therapies accessibleRegulate and monitor the use of ototoxic medicines and environmental noiseRaise awareness to promote hearing care and reduce stigma
This is over 5% of the world’s population; 34 million of these people are children. Unless action is taken, by 2030 there will be nearly 630 million people with disabling hearing loss. By 2050, the number could rise to over 900 million. Disabling hearing loss is defined as:
There are significant costs associated with the impacts of unaddressed hearing loss. These include costs to the health, education and employment sectors as well as the costs associated with lost productivity. Interventions to address hearing loss including prevention, screening and provision of hearing devices are cost effective.
It is estimated that up to five out of every 1000 babies are born with hearing loss or acquire it soon after birth. Hearing loss can have a significant impact on a child’s development and educational achievements. Early identification of such hearing loss followed by prompt and suitable interventions can help to ensure that children with deafness and hearing loss enjoy equal opportunities in society.
Over 30% of hearing loss in children is caused by diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis and ear infections. It is estimated that up to 330 million people suffer with chronic ear infections or chronic otitis media globally. When left untreated, chronic ear infections lead to hearing loss and can cause life-threatening complications and mortality. Chronic ear infections are preventable and can be managed effectively through medical and surgical interventions.
Nearly 1 out of every 3 people over 65 years are affected by disabling hearing loss.Left untreated, hearing loss can lead to people being excluded from the most basic communication, thereby contributing to feelings of loneliness, frustration and social isolation. Hearing loss in the elderly is linked with early cognitive decline and dementia. Age-related hearing loss can be managed effectively through a variety of means, including hearing aids.
In many places occupational noise, such as the loud sounds of machinery and explosions, has become the most compensated occupational hazard. Occupational noise can largely be prevented through improved awareness of the danger it poses and use of personal protective devices. Some commonly used medicines (such as aminoglycosides and certain anti-malarial medicines) can also lead to irreversible hearing loss. Ototoxicity can be prevented by raising awareness of its risks among health care providers and by the rational use of drugs.
People with hearing loss can benefit from devices such as hearing aids and cochlear implants.Current production of hearing aids meets less than 10% of the global need, and in developing countries, this figure is less than 3%. It is estimated that there are 72 million people who could potentially benefit from the use of a hearing device.
Deaf people often use sign language as a means of communication. Family members, medical professionals, teachers and employers should be encouraged to learn signs/sign language in order to facilitate communication with deaf people. The use of loop systems in classrooms and public places, as well as the provision of captions on audio-visual media, are important for improving the accessibility of communication for people with hearing loss.
Strengthen maternal and child healthcare programmes including immunizationImplement infant and school-based hearing screeningTrain healthcare professionals in hearing careMake hearing devices and communication therapies accessibleRegulate and monitor the use of ototoxic medicines and environmental noiseRaise awareness to promote hearing care and reduce stigma
*Screening* :
According to Steven , MD reveald that a family history of hearing loss does put a newborn at higher risk for having a hearing loss. But rest assured, your baby’s hearing can be monitored closely so that if there is a problem, treatment can begin as soon as possible.
In most states, hospitals do a newborn hearing screening before the baby goes home. If it’s not done then, or the baby was born at home or a birthing center, it’s important to get a newborn hearing screening within the first 3 weeks of life.
A baby who doesn’t pass a hearing screening doesn’t necessarily have a hearing loss. A retest to confirm the hearing loss should be done within the first 3 months of life. If it confirms a problem, doctors should start treatment by the time the child is 6 months old.
Even if your newborn passes the initial hearing screening, watch for signs that he or she is hearing well. Hearing milestones that should be reached in the first year of life include:
Most newborns startle or “jump” to sudden loud noises.By 3 months, a baby usually recognizes a parent’s voice.By 6 months, babies can usually turn their eyes or head toward a sound.By 12 months, babies can usually imitate some sounds and produce a few words, such as “Mama” or “bye-bye.”
A child may be at higher risk for hearing loss if he or she:was born prematurelystayed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)was given medicines that can lead to hearing losshad complications at birthhas frequent ear infectionshad infections that can damage hearing, such as meningitis or cytomegalovirus
Kids should have their hearing evaluated at regular checkups. Hearing tests usually are done at ages 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, and 18 years, and at other times if there’s a concern.
Early detection of hearing status is one of the first steps which allow the best opportunities to develop communication skills and start early intervention services by 6 months of age for babies who have, or are at risk for developing a permanent hearing status that affects the development of communication skills.

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